Comics Coast To Coast #193 – The Adam Huber Interview Part 2

By brian

Bug Martini
Adam Huber joins Brian Dunaway, Joel Duggan and Matthew Ducharme to talk about his webcomic Bug Martini (it was just Bug…but now 100% more martini!) This is Adam’s second time on our podcast. We look forward to a third.
Bug Marini By Adam Huber
http://www.bugmartini.com
About Artist:
http://www.bugmartini.com/about/the-cartoonist/
About The Comic
http://www.bugmartini.com/about/the-strip/

Show Notes:

The last time you were on the show, your strip had a similar but different name, Bug. What brought on the change? How much of a pain in the ass was it to rename the comic? Were you worried about how it would effect your readers? Joel
Were there any thoughts to re-designing the website with the rebranding? (Not that there is anythin wrong with thet website!) Joel
I’m calling you out – since you already talked about it on Twitter – How’s life as a newly 40-year-old cartoonist? Joel
Streaming. You know, the streaming question. The one about streaming. (I kinda have to go pee now.) Joel
You said in a recent comic that you had all the range and wanderlust of a pet turtle. Does that make conventions a bit tough? Matt
Your not afraid to tackle the subject matter of god in your comics. Have you gotten any backlash from it? Matt
Are you watching Cosmos? My favorite Hitchhickers Guide To The Galaxy quote : Brian
In the beginning the Universe was created. This has made a lot of people very angry and has been widely regarded as a bad move.

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Comics Coast To Coast #192 – The Ryan Estrada Interview

By brian

Broken Telephone
Ryan Estrada joins Brian Dunaway, Joel Duggan and Matthew Ducharme to talk about his life as an artist/adventurer who is globetrotting around the world while creating and collaborating on comics.
Broken Telephone (The Whole Story 2014) By Ryan Estrada
https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/ryanestrada/broken-telephone-the-whole-story-2014
Ryan Estrada spent 7 years writing 18 stories that join together to tell one crazy, globe-spanning crime caper where every character is the hero of their own story and the villain of someone else’s. Now, he’s teamed up with 18 amazing artists to bring those stories to life.
About Artist:
http://www.ryanestrada.com/
An artist/adventurer who travels the world making comics and videos. He is the creator of the graphic novels Aki Alliance, The Kind, and Ped X-ing. His work has been featured in Villard Books’ ‘Flight: Volume 4,’ Grand Central Publishing’s ‘This Is How You Die: Stories of the Inscrutable, Infallible, Inescapable Machine of Death,’ and DC’s Zuda Comics. He also runs Cartoon Commune, a custom comics/illustration service, and The Whole Story, offering pay-what-you-want digital comics.
About The Comic
https://gumroad.com/l/brokentelephone
Broken Telephone is 18 books illustrated by 18+ artists. You can read any book you want whenever you want, but if you read them in order, something amazing happens. Each character is the hero of their story, and the villain of someone else’s. They never meet, and everyone does what they think is right, but together they do a whole lot of wrong.

Show Notes:

Tell us about Broken Telephone. The project. How it started. How is it going. Where is it going.
That’s a lot of artists to wrangle! That’s more of a statement than a question…how about…how are you handling it? Who’s managing these people!
Does globetrotting ever make it difficult to get to the comic? I can barely get anything done on a regular routine…or does it energize you!
What is in your mobile artists backpack to be able to capture your creativity and produce comics while traveling.
You must have had some fantastic opportunities to just sit and sketch. Wildlife especially.
Do you ever talk to Eric? Go on motorcycle rides? fight crime?
How is the Broken Telephone project progressing?
With as much travelling as you’ve done, how do you think your world view differs from most Americans?
Your webcomic “The Kind” has a photographed backgrounds with cartoon art on top. How difficult was that to pull off?
http://www.ryanestrada.com/thekind/
Follow up: what prompted the cartooning over photo?
As a artist yourself, was it scary or exciting to hand off pieces of your story to other artists? How much did you direct them?
What about apps? Ebooks?
https://www.celtx.com/index.html

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Comics Coast To Coast #191 – The Mini Sized Show

By brian

stripped

Join Brian, Joel and Matt on this mini size episode of CC2C for an update to a few of our favorite comic related Kickstarter projects.

http://www.strippedfilm.com/

(src: http://www.strippedfilm.com/about/) STRIPPED is a love-letter to comic strips. It brings together the world’s best cartoonists to talk about the art form they love, and what happens to it as newspapers die. Over 90 interviews were conducted, including the first-ever audio interview withBill Watterson (Calvin & Hobbes), as well as Jim Davis (Garfield), Cathy Guisewite(Cathy), Mort Walker (Beetle Bailey), Mike & Jerry (Penny Arcade), Matt Inman (The Oatmeal), Jeff Keane (The Family Circus), Ryan North (Dinosaur Comics), Lynn Johnston (FBOFW), Zach Weiner (SMBC), Scott Kurtz (PvP), Scott McCloud(Understanding Comics), Richard Thompson (Cul de Sac), Jeph Jacques(Questionable Content), Stephan Pastis (Pearls Before Swine), Bill Amend (Foxtrot), Kate Beaton (Hark! A Vagrant) and more. STRIPPED sits down with these creators to talk about how cartooning works, why it’s so loved, and how they’re navigating this dicey period between print and digital options…when neither path works perfectly.

Even more than comics, this movie’s about pursuing art in an age when the business of art is changing constantly.

http://animationdock.com/

(src: http://animationdock.com/#the-low-down)

What is it?

Simply put, the Animation Dock is an animation desk for tablets. See, back when people did traditional animation on paper, they had these really spiffy, classically-designed desks with a rotating disc in the center. This allowed animators to rotate the paper as they drew, always ensuring they could get the best angle while pumping out beautiful animations. The animation dock recreates that experience– except instead of paper, we’re doing it with the iPad.

We want to remind everyone that the simple act of drawing is the only skill you truly need to bring stories to life

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Comics Coast To Coast #190 – The Vince Dorse Interview

By brian

Untold Tales of Bigfoot page 038
Vince Dorse joins Brian Dunaway, Joel Duggan and Matthew Ducharme to talk about his award winning comic Untold Tales Of Bigfoot.
Comics Title By Artist
http://untoldtalesofbigfoot.com
About Artist:
http://www.vincedorse.com/contact.html
I draw pictures.
Honestly, that’s about all I do. I wake up in the morning, stagger behind my computer and start drawing. Some time around dinner I stop to eat but then it’s draw draw draw until I fall asleep again.
About The Comic
http://untoldtalesofbigfoot.com/about/
Untold Tales of Bigfoot is the story of an adorably inept dog named Scout who gets lost in the woods during an ill-fated camping trip and runs smack-dab into a lonely Bigfoot looking for a friend. Will Bigfoot finally make a friend? Will Scout ever get home?

Show Notes:

I really enjoy the role reversal of speaking owner and dog. How did you arrive at that pairing?
Are you a camper? Were you a camping family growing up?
Where do the phrases like “Crumbcakes!” and “Sweet baby corn!” come from?
Do you have a set story arc for The Untold Tales Of Bigfoot? Or would you like it to be an ongoing comic?
You’re posting a full color comic page every week. Tell us about your art process. Traditional? Digital? Walk us through a blank page to comic shared online.
In 2012 you received the Reuben Award for best online comic, long form. What was that experience like? Any good stories from the event?
What a great story and character driven comic. Are you ever tempted to do more than 1 a week or break down the pages into smaller chunks?
I noticed you swap a lot of Fan Art with other cartoonist (including a really cool stuffed bigfoot) is this part of your master plan? or just for funs?
Did you ever see that episode of “In Search Of” where Spock hangs out with BigFoot? How about that episode of The 6-Million Dollar Man?
How much of a monkey wrench would be thrown into your comic if someone captured a big foot? Suddenly fiction is fact!
You don’t just post a comic once a week, you also post a blog and sometimes your process. Is that a lot of work? Worth it?
Your work has a bit of a retro feel to it. What are some of the comics that influenced you ?
Looking at the pages online, it feels like they were originally designed for print. Is that the ultimate goal?
Good golly, you are prolific. How many comics have you made and where do you find the time?
Doylecomic 1:33pm via Twitter for Mac
@thebriandunaway @comicsc2c @vincedorse I got a question, why is Vince so damn good?
http://www.underwhelmedcomic.com/

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Comics Coast To Coast #189 – The Lora Innes Interview

By brian

The Dreamer
Lora Innes joins Brian Dunaway, Joel Duggan and Matthew Ducharme to talk about her comic The Dreamer
The Dreamer
http://www.thedreamercomic.com
About Artist:
http://www.thedreamercomic.com/about.html
Lora Innes graduated Suma Cum Laude in 2002 from the Columbus College of Art and Design with a Bachelors in Fine Art. She worked for several years at the Artifact Group, doing illustration for clients such as Fisher Price, Mattel, McGraw Hill, Nickelodeon, Scholastic and Simon & Schuster. Now she writes and draws The Dreamer and wouldn’t trade it for the world.
About The Comic
http://www.thedreamercomic.com/about.html
Beatrice “Bea” Whaley seems to have it all; the seventeen year old high school senior is beautiful, wealthy and the star performer of the drama club. And with her uncle’s connections to Broadway theater, the future looks bright ahead of her. Little does she know that her future might actually be brighter behind her…
Bea begins having vivid dreams about a brave and handsome soldier named Alan Warren–a member of an elite group known as Knowlton’s Rangers that served during the Revolutionary War. Prone to keeping her head in the clouds, Bea welcomes her nightly adventures in 1776; filled with danger and romance they give her much to muse about the next day. But it is not long before Beatrice questions whether her dreams are simply dreams or something more. Each night they pick up exactly where the last one ended. And the senses–the smell of musket shots and cannons, the screams of soldiers in agony, and that kiss–are all far more real than any dream she can remember.

Show Notes:

Podcast
http://paperwingspodcast.com/
Art
You have an obvious comfort with the figure and expression. Can you tell us a bit about your artistic background? Joel
There is an incredible amount of detail in The Dreamer, specifically the costumes, is your computer bursting at the seams with reference photos? Joel
How concerned were you with historical accuracy? Matt
Each Issue of The Dreamer seems to have it’s own personality. Each issue seems impacted/inlficted by your artist growth. Brian
Writing
Just like your artwork it seems like each issues has it’s own tone in your writing. I love that I can see your life in these books. Brian
With such a large body of work can you recall a time when you ever said…”that’s it. I’m done.” Brian
Such a weighty subject. Do you ever get crap from historians? Praise? Are you in the local school library. Brian
Blog/Life:
You recently took a sabbatical from The Dreamer. Life just gets in the way some times. What were your fears coming up to that decision? Joel
What was the reaction of your readers? Did it surprise you? Joel
I just want to take a moment to thank Lora for introducing me to J David Petruzzi via Twitter Matt
Google+ Webcomic Community
Bob Henninger asks:
One thing I always have enjoyed on Comics C2C is when you managed to ask about their techniques, hardware, software, tools, etc. Perhaps you could squeeze that in?
Love On 46
Comics Creators For Freedom
http://comiccreatorsforfreedom.com/

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Comics Coast To Coast #188 – Host Show – Social Media For You

By brian

SocMe
On this episode of Comics Coast to Coast Brian gets snowed in and Joel and Matt discuss Facebook, Google+ and other social media hooha for your enjoyment and education….and…

Show Notes:

Facebook video:
The Problem With Facebook by Veritasium (Channel2)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l9ZqXlHl65g
Google+ Community
https://plus.google.com/communities/106742014422516775756
From the Google+ Community:
From P. J. Day
This is deceptively difficult environment to market a comic strip, despite the a boon of social media outlets. Facebook is limited to your friends list and it’s dying. My feed reaches my daughter and some crack-pot lady who posts articles about the Illuminati. Twitter is deceptive. It looks like your getting all this attention when you have 100 followers, but I really can’t say how much traffic I have gained based on my Twitter updates and followers. Google Plus has some potential because you can post to groups and a wider audiance and they seem more responsive than Facebook groups.
What I have found recently is, unlike newspaper syndicates that might reach an un-targeted audience of thousands, the social media marketing tools I’m using has gained me focused, more intimate audience. Most of those of my readers are artists from web comics I personally follow and comment on their sites. This has been the biggest contributor of readers on my site. networking directly on other artist’s sites. However, they are all a part of the same inner circle… and that’s really ok. Ultimately, It’s all about exposure to and audience that’s interested in your material, and that’s exactly what I have.
From James Francis
I think it is still hard to quantify the impact of social media, but rather damned that you do than don’t. Social media creates quasi-gated communities who can grow to be nice captive audiences. The question is what you should spend your energy on.
Tip: Share resources
Tip: Participate in groups/events. Ex: @sketch_dailies
Tip: A rule I have created for myself is to only favorite art on deviantART if I can articulate why and then write that as a comment.
Matt’s Notes
Tip: Asking questions.
Tip: Find fans that you’re talking to and post it to another venue. (Fan site, etc.)

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